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Updates/News

"Xylitol study reaches TV news in USA" --Danisco Chemical Co., July 21, 2009
A new Xylitol study providing evidence of the prevention of tooth decay in babies has just been published and the results are so noteworthy, ABC News picked up on the story.

"Xylitol bears show dental health potential" --FoodNavigator-usa.com, July 25, 2008
Gummy bear candies, not traditionally seen as a first line of defence in battling tooth decay, may play some role in providing oral health care to children when containing some sugar alcohols, according to a new clinical trial in the US.a>

"Xylitol's potential beyond gum explored" --FoodNavigator-usa.com, February 20, 2008
The use of xylitol, a natural sweetener linked to dental health, could prevent the formation of undesirable brown pigments and enhance beverage formulations, suggests new research.

"Cases of Xylitol Poisoning In Dogs Rise" --AVMA, October 1, 2006
"The Animal Poison Control Center of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has managed a substantially increased number of cases involving xylitol poisoning in dogs. Found in sugar-free chewing gum, candy, and baked goods, xylitol is a sweetener that can cause serious and sometimes life-threatening problems for pets.

"No Sugar Coating: Products Sweetened With Xylitol Can Be Toxic To Dogs" --ASPCA, August 21, 2006
"Last year, we managed more than 170 cases involving xylitol-containing products, says Dana Farbman, CVT and spokesperson for the Center. "This is a significant increase from 2004, when we managed about 70." Barely halfway into 2006, the Center has already managed about 114 cases. Why the increase? "Its difficult to say," Farbman states. "Xylitol products are relatively new to the United States marketplace, so one possibility may be an increase in availability." --Dana Farbman, ASPCA

"The use of xylitol-sweetened chewing gum in caries control" --Brian A. Burt, BDS, MPH, PhD, February 2006
"The evidence is strong enough to support the regular use of xylitol-sweetened gum as a way to prevent caries, and it can be promoted as a public-health preventive measure.

"Sugar Substitutes: Americans Opt for Sweetness and Lite" --John Henkel, Staff Writer, FDA Consumer, 1999
"Sugar Alcohols: Though not technically considered artificial sweeteners, sugar alcohols are slightly lower in calories than sugar and do not promote tooth decay or cause a sudden increase in blood glucose. They include sorbitol, xylitol, lactitol, mannitol, and maltitol and are used mainly to sweeten sugar-free candies, cookies, and chewing gums. FDA classifies some of these sweeteners as "generally recognized as safe" and others as approved food additives.